Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas.

The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that is shaped like a thin pear lying on its side. The wider end of the pancreas is called the head, the middle section is called the body, and the narrow end is called the tail. The pancreas lies between the stomach and the spine.

The pancreas has two main jobs in the body:
  • To make juices that help digest (break down) food.
  • To make hormones, such as insulin and glucagon, that help control blood sugar levels. Both of these hormones help the body use and store the energy it gets from food.

Smoking and health history can affect the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Risk factors for pancreatic cancer include the following:
  • Smoking.
  • Being very overweight.
  • Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis.
  • Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis.
  • Having certain hereditary conditions

Pancreatic cancer may not cause early signs or symptoms. Signs and symptoms may be caused by pancreatic cancer or by other conditions.

Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes).
  • Light-colored stools.
  • Dark urine.
  • Pain in the upper or middle abdomen and back.
  • Weight loss for no known reason.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Feeling very tired.
Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect and diagnose for the following reasons:
  • There aren’t any noticeable signs or symptoms in the early stages of pancreatic cancer.
  • The signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer, when present, are like the signs and symptoms of many other illnesses.
  • The pancreas is hidden behind other organs such as the stomach, small intestine, liver, gallbladder, spleen, and bile ducts.
Five types of standard treatment are used:
  • Surgery
  • Radiation therapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Chemoradiation therapy
  • Targeted therapy
The prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options depend on the following:
  • Whether or not the tumor can be removed by surgery.
  • The stage of the cancer (the size of the tumor and whether the cancer has spread outside the pancreas to nearby tissues or lymph nodes or to other places in the body).
  • The patient’s general health.
  • Whether the cancer has just been diagnosed or has recurred (come back).

Pancreatic cancer can be controlled only if it is found before it has spread, when it can be completely removed by surgery. If the cancer has spread, palliative treatment can improve the patient's quality of life by controlling the symptoms and complications of this disease.