Vascular Medicine

Spider Veins

They involve the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in the body. Spider veins are usually red or blue and may look like a spider web or tree branch. They typically pose no health hazard, but can sometimes cause dull aching in the legs after prolonged standing.  

Venefit

A vein specialist inserts a Covidien ClosureFast™ Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) Catheter to collapse and close enlarged leg veins. After the vein is sealed shut, blood naturally re-routes to healthy veins.

TriVex

During the procedure, a tiny light is passed under the vein to illuminate it for your doctor to see it clearly. Then, another small device is inserted and the damaged vein is removed. We are the only practice in Georgia offering the TriVex™ Procedure. The TriVex treatment is performed as an outpatient hospital procedure.

Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy involves an injection of a solution (such as sodium chloride, a salt solution, or sotradecol, a detergent directly into the vein. The solution irritates the lining of the blood vessel, causing it to swell and stick together, and the blood to clot. Over time, the vessel turns into scar tissue that fades from view. Sclerotherapy is a well-proven procedure and has been in use since the 1930's.

peripheral artery disease

In PAD, the arteries that carry oxygenated blood throughout the body become narrowed or even blocked, usually as a result of atherosclerosis, or plaque. Your doctor may recommend certain lifestyle changes to treat your condition. Bypass surgery or interventional procedures such as angioplasty, catheter-directed thrombolysis or atherectomy may be used to help improve blood flow.

Edema

It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include Eating too much salt Sunburn Heart failure Kidney disease Liver problems from cirrhosis Pregnancy Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy Some medicines Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill.

Vasculitis

Vasculitis can affect arteries, veins and capillaries. Arteries are vessels that carry blood from the heart to the body's organs. Veins are the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect the small arteries and veins. When a blood vessel becomes inflamed, it can Narrow, making it more difficult for blood to get through Close off completely so that blood can't get through Stretch and weaken so much that it bulges. The bulge is called an aneurysm. If it bursts, it can cause dangerous bleeding inside the body. Symptoms of vasculitis can vary, but usually include fever, swelling and a general sense of feeling ill. The main goal of treatment is to stop the inflammation. Steroids and other medicines to stop inflammation are often helpful.