Heart Health

Anemia

Conditions that may lead to anemia include Heavy periods Pregnancy Ulcers Colon polyps or colon cancer Inherited disorders A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid, or vitamin B12 Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache. Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have.

Atrial Fibrillation

In AF, blood pools in the atria. It isn't pumped completely into the heart's two lower chambers, called the ventricles. As a result, the heart's upper and lower chambers don't work together as they should. People who have AF may not feel symptoms. However, even when AF isn't noticed, it can increase the risk of stroke. In some people, AF can cause chest pain or heart failure, especially if the heart rhythm is very rapid. AF may happen rarely or every now and then, or it may become an ongoing or long-term heart problem that lasts for years.

Aneurysm

Most aneurysms are in the aorta, the main artery that runs from the heart through the chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during tests done for other reasons. Some people are at high risk for aneurysms. It is important for them to get screening, because aneurysms can develop and become large before causing any symptoms Screening is recommended for people between the ages of 65 and 75 if they have a family history, or if they are men who have smoked. Doctors use imaging tests to find aneurysms. Medicines and surgery are the two main treatments.