Dermatology

Seborrheic Dermatitis

It can occur with or without reddened skin. Cradle cap is the term used when seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp of infants.  

Rosacea

It causes redness and pimples. Rosacea is most common in women and people with fair skin. It most often affects middle-aged and older adults. In most cases, rosacea only affects the face. Symptoms can include Frequent redness of the face, or flushing Small, red lines under the skin Acne A swollen nose Thick skin, usually on the forehead, chin, and cheeks Red, dry, itchy eyes and sometimes vision problems No one knows what causes rosacea. You may be more likely to have it if you blush a lot or if rosacea runs in your family. Rosacea is not dangerous. There is no cure, but treatments can help. They include medicines and sometimes surgery.    

Scabies

It is common all over the world, and can affect anyone. Scabies spreads quickly in crowded conditions where there is frequent skin-to-skin contact between people. Hospitals, child-care centers, and nursing homes are examples. Scabies can easily infect sex partners and other household members. Sharing clothes, towels, and bedding can sometimes spread scabies. This can happen much more easily when the infested person has crusted scabies. You cannot get scabies from a pet. Pets get a different mite infection called mange. Symptoms are Pimple-like irritations or a rash Intense itching, especially at night Sores caused by scratching Your health care provider diagnoses scabies by looking at the skin rash and finding burrows in the skin. Several lotions are available to treat scabies. The infected person's clothes, bedding and towels should be washed in hot water and dried in a hot dryer. Treatment is also recommended for household members and sexual partners.  

Psoriasis

You usually get the patches on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet, but they can show up on other parts of your body. Some people who have psoriasis also get a form of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis. A problem with your immune system causes psoriasis. In a process called cell turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to the surface. Normally, this takes a month. In psoriasis, it happens in just days because your cells rise too fast. Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose because it can look like other skin diseases. Your doctor might need to look at a small skin sample under a microscope. Psoriasis can last a long time, even a lifetime. Symptoms come and go. Things that make them worse include Infections Stress Dry skin Certain medicines Psoriasis usually occurs in adults. It sometimes runs in families. Treatments include creams, medicines, and light therapy.  

Poison ivy

The sap may be on the plant, in the ashes of burned plants, on an animal, or on other objects that came in contact with the plant, such as clothing, garden tools, and sports equipment. Small amounts of sap can remain under a person's fingernails for several days unless it is deliberately removed with very good cleaning. This family of plants (Toxicodendron) is hardy and difficult to eradicate. They are found in every state of the continental United States. They grow best along cool streams and lakes and luxuriate if it is also sunny and hot. They do not grow in Alaska or Hawaii, and do not survive well above 5000 feet, in deserts, or in rainforests. If you have an exposure, you should call your local emergency number (such as 911) or the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Moles

Moles are growths on the skin. They happen when pigment cells in the skin, called melanocytes, grow in clusters. Moles are very common. Most people have between 10 and 40 moles. A person may develop new moles from time to time, usually until about age 40. In older people, they tend to fade away. Moles are usually pink, tan or brown. They can be flat or raised. They are usually round or oval and no larger than a pencil eraser. About one out of every ten people has at least one unusual (or atypical) mole that looks different from an ordinary mole. They are called dysplastic nevi. They may be more likely than ordinary moles to develop into melanoma, a type of skin cancer. You should have a health care professional check your moles if they look unusual, grow larger, change in color or outline, or in any other way.  

Melanoma

Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or "ugly looking." Thinking of "ABCDE" can help you remember what to watch for: Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.