Sleeve Gastrectomy

During the sleeve gastrectomy procedure, a thin vertical sleeve of stomach is created using a stapling device. The sleeve is about the size of a banana. As a result, patients feel fuller sooner and stay satisfied longer. Sleeve gastrectomy allows for normal digestion and absorption.

After surgery, the food you swallow is still allowed to pass through this new sleeve and into the small intestines as this connection has not been altered.  Removal of this portion of the stomach aides in weight loss by reducing the volume of food one can eat and by debulking a portion of the stomach that releases hormones that can drive hunger and appetite.


During Sleeve Gastrectomy

During this procedure a portion of the stomach is removed. The surgeon creates a sleeve or tube like structure by stapling along the greater curvature of the stomach. Therefore, only about 25% of the stomach remains. After surgery, the food you swallow is still allowed to pass through this new sleeve and into the small intestines as this connection has not been altered.  Removal of this portion of the stomach aides in weight loss by reducing the volume of food one can eat and by debulking a portion of the stomach that releases hormones that can drive hunger and appetite.

After Sleeve Gastrectomy

After surgery, you will be required to follow a strict diet and significant lifestyle changes. 

For approximately 4 weeks, you will need to eat foods in a liquid or pureed state.  Eating solid foods too soon will put pressure on the staple line and may cause serious complications such as a leak.  It is important that, during this time, all the food you eat be the consistency of thin, smooth, applesauce. During this time you will need to eat 5-6 times a day. Each meal will be 2-4 oz (1/4 to ½ cup of food).

With your doctor’s approval at 4 weeks after surgery, you may advance to semi-solid, or soft foods. You will need to eat 4-6 times a day. Each meal will be 4-6 ounces (½ - ¾ cup of food).  Care should be taken not to snack or graze between these meals.

Around 12 weeks after surgery with your doctor’s approval, you may begin to try raw vegetables and tougher meats. You will need to try foods one item at a time to test your tolerance to them.  Do not worry if you cannot handle foods you used to eat.  Most people experience some problems at first, especially with dry meats and breads.  However, these problems usually resolve with behavioral modifications and more time. Eventually all textures of foods are well tolerated.

Read About Post Op Diet Phases