Urology

Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction. It is when a man has trouble getting or keeping an erection. ED becomes more common as you get older. But it's not a natural part of aging. Some people have trouble speaking with their doctors about sex. But if you have ED, you should tell your doctor. ED can be a sign of health problems. It may mean your blood vessels are clogged. It may mean you have nerve damage from diabetes. If you don't see your doctor, these problems will go untreated. Your doctor can offer several new treatments for ED. For many men, the answer is as simple as taking a pill. Getting more exercise, losing weight, or stopping smoking may also help.  

Testicular Cancer

Testicles are the two egg-shaped organs inside the scrotum, the loose sac of skin behind the penis. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of 20 and 39. It is also more common in men who: Have had abnormal testicle development Have had an undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your testicles or groin area. Doctors use a physical exam, lab tests, imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose testicular cancer. Most cases can be treated, especially if found early. Treatment options include surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Regular exams after treatment are important. Treatments may also cause infertility. If you may want children later on, you should consider sperm banking before treatment.  

Prostate Cancer

It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling Low back pain Pain with ejaculation To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments.  

Kidney Cancer

You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and clean your blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes inside your kidneys. Kidney cancer becomes more likely as you age. Risk factors include smoking, having certain genetic conditions, and misusing pain medicines for a long time. You may have no symptoms at first. They may appear as the cancer grows. See your health care provider if you notice Blood in your urine A lump in your abdomen Weight loss for no reason Pain in your side that does not go away Loss of appetite Treatment depends on your age, your overall health and how advanced the cancer is. It might include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation, biologic, or targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.  

Bladder Cancer

The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. It is the sixth most common type of cancer in the United States. Symptoms include: Blood in your urine A frequent urge to urinate Pain when you urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in the workplace. People with a family history of bladder cancer or who are older, white, or male have a higher risk. Treatments for bladder cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biologic therapy. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer.  

Urology

Urology cares for the urinary tracts of males and females, and treats diseases and conditions of the male reproductive organs. We are committed to the detection, treatment and prevention of urological diseases. Through the use of the latest diagnostic testing and treatment techniques, we can effectively identify and treat such conditions as urinary tract infections, overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, infertility, kidney stones and prostate cancer. Our highly trained doctors and staff are sensitive to your needs and will address all of your concerns to ensure you receive the best treatment for your specific case. Harbin Clinic urologists perform hundreds of minimally invasive operations each year for a variety of urologic problems. These minimally invasive surgical procedures produce excellent results, and patients often have shorter hospital stays, less discomfort and bleeding, and a shorter recovery period. We are dedicated to providing the highest level of care in a professional and caring atmosphere. At Harbin Clinic Urology, your treatment and satisfaction are our top priority.  We appreciate the trust you have placed in our team. Call 762-235-2200 to schedule an appointment