Skin Conditions

Cold Sores

There are two types of HSV. Type 1 usually causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area.

Dermatitis

It is a chronic disease characterized by dry, itchy skin that can lead to redness, swelling, cracking, or weep clear fluid when scratched. People with eczema also may be particularly susceptible to bacterial, viral, and fungal skin infections. Affects an estimated 30 percent of the U.S. population, mostly children and adolescents.  People who live in cities and dry climates may be more likely to get this disease.

Fungal Infections

Most fungi are not dangerous, but some types can be harmful to health, and people with deficient immune systems are more vulnerable to symptomatic infection.  T Fungal skin infections affect an estimated 29 million people nationwide. Since fungi reproduce through tiny spores in the air, fungal infections often start in the lungs or on the skin.  Fungi can be difficult to kill. For skin and nail infections, you can apply medicine directly to the infected area. Oral antifungal medicines are also available for serious infections. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/fungal-findings https://www.niaid.nih.gov/clinical-trials/fungal-disease-studies https://medlineplus.gov/fungalinfections.html

Vitiligo

It can also affect your eyes, mouth, and nose. It occurs when the cells that give your skin its color are destroyed. No one knows what destroys them. It is more common in people with autoimmune diseases, and it might run in families. It usually starts before age 40. The white patches are more common where your skin is exposed to the sun. In some cases, the patches spread. Vitiligo can cause your hair to gray early. If you have dark skin, you may lose color inside your mouth. Using sunscreen will help protect your skin, and cosmetics can cover up the patches. Treatments for vitiligo include medicines, light therapy, and surgery. Not every treatment is right for everyone. Many have side effects. Some take a long time. Some do not always work.

Warts

Most of the time they are harmless. They are caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). Some types of warts are spread through sex. Certain warts have an increased risk of cancer. Your health care provider can discuss this with you. Warts may affect your appearance and can be embarrassing. Warts may itch or hurt (especially when they are on the feet).

Squamous Cell Cancer

The American Cancer Society recommends that a provider examines your skin every year if you are older than 40 and every 3 years if you are 20 to 40 years old. You should also examine your own skin once a month. If you have had skin cancer, you should have regular checkups so that a doctor can examine your skin. You should also check your own skin once a month. Use a hand mirror for hard-to-see places. Call your doctor if you notice anything unusual. The best way to prevent skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

It can occur with or without reddened skin. Cradle cap is the term used when seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp of infants.  

Rosacea

It causes redness and pimples. Rosacea is most common in women and people with fair skin. It most often affects middle-aged and older adults. In most cases, rosacea only affects the face. Symptoms can include Frequent redness of the face, or flushing Small, red lines under the skin Acne A swollen nose Thick skin, usually on the forehead, chin, and cheeks Red, dry, itchy eyes and sometimes vision problems No one knows what causes rosacea. You may be more likely to have it if you blush a lot or if rosacea runs in your family. Rosacea is not dangerous. There is no cure, but treatments can help. They include medicines and sometimes surgery.    

Scabies

It is common all over the world, and can affect anyone. Scabies spreads quickly in crowded conditions where there is frequent skin-to-skin contact between people. Hospitals, child-care centers, and nursing homes are examples. Scabies can easily infect sex partners and other household members. Sharing clothes, towels, and bedding can sometimes spread scabies. This can happen much more easily when the infested person has crusted scabies. You cannot get scabies from a pet. Pets get a different mite infection called mange. Symptoms are Pimple-like irritations or a rash Intense itching, especially at night Sores caused by scratching Your health care provider diagnoses scabies by looking at the skin rash and finding burrows in the skin. Several lotions are available to treat scabies. The infected person's clothes, bedding and towels should be washed in hot water and dried in a hot dryer. Treatment is also recommended for household members and sexual partners.  

Psoriasis

You usually get the patches on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet, but they can show up on other parts of your body. Some people who have psoriasis also get a form of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis. A problem with your immune system causes psoriasis. In a process called cell turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to the surface. Normally, this takes a month. In psoriasis, it happens in just days because your cells rise too fast. Psoriasis can be hard to diagnose because it can look like other skin diseases. Your doctor might need to look at a small skin sample under a microscope. Psoriasis can last a long time, even a lifetime. Symptoms come and go. Things that make them worse include Infections Stress Dry skin Certain medicines Psoriasis usually occurs in adults. It sometimes runs in families. Treatments include creams, medicines, and light therapy.