Shoulder

Shoulder Arthroscopy

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and their tendons that form a cuff over the shoulder joint. These muscles and tendons hold the arm in the shoulder joint and help the shoulder move in different directions. The tendons in the rotator cuff can tear when they are overused or injured. During the procedure, the surgeon: Inserts the arthroscope into your shoulder through a small incision. The scope is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. Inspects all the tissues of your shoulder joint and the area above the joint. These tissues include the cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments. Repairs any damaged tissues. To do this, your surgeon makes 1 to 3 more small incisions and inserts other instruments through them. A tear in a muscle, tendon, or cartilage is fixed. Any damaged tissue is removed. Your surgeon may do one or more procedures during your operation, for example: Rotator cuff repair  Surgery for impegement syndrome Surgery for shoulder instability At the end of the surgery, the incisions will be closed with stitches and covered with a dressing (bandage). Most surgeons take pictures from the video monitor during the procedure to show you what they found and the repairs that were made. Your surgeon may need to do open surgery if there is a lot of damage. Open surgery means you will have a large incision so that the surgeon can get directly to your bones and tissues. Arthroscopy often results in less pain and stiffness, fewer complications, a shorter (if any) hospital stay, and faster recovery than open surgery.

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is a condition in which the shoulder is painful and loses motion because of inflammation. The capsule of the shoulder joint has ligaments that hold the shoulder bones to each other. When the capsule becomes inflamed, the shoulder bones are unable to move freely in the joint.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability refers to a shoulder joint that is too loose. The joint may slide around or become dislocated. 

Shoulder Dislocation

Your shoulder joint is made up of three bones: your collarbone, your shoulder blade, and your upper arm bone. The top of your upper arm bone is shaped like a ball. This ball fits into a cup-like socket in your shoulder blade. A shoulder dislocation is an injury that happens when the ball pops out of your socket. A dislocation may be partial, where the ball is only partially out of the socket. It can also be a full dislocation, where the ball is completely out of the socket.

Rotator Cuff Tear

A rotator cuff tear occurs when one of the tendons of the rotator cuff is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. There are two types of rotator cuff tears: A partial tear occurs when a tear does not completely sever the attachments to the bone A complete, full thickness tear means that the tear goes all the way through the tendon. It may be as small as a pinpoint, or the tear may involve the entire tendon. With complete tears, the tendon has come off (detached) from where it was attached to the bone. This kind of tear does not heal on its own

Rotator Cuff Repair

Rotator cuff repair is surgery to repair a torn tendon in the shoulder. The procedure can be done with a large (open) incision or with shoulder arthroscopy, which uses smaller incisions.

Rotator Cuff

Your rotator cuff is a group of four muscles on your shoulder blade with tendons that attach to the "ball" of your humerus (upper arm bone). These muscles and tendons help you to lift and rotate your arms. They also help hold the ball of your humerus firmly in your shoulder socket.

Arthroscopy

A surgical technique that involves making a small incision in the skin over the joint. A small lighted tube (arthroscope) with a camera is inserted through this incision.

Joint Replacement Surgery

Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. Replacing a joint can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.