Knee

Kneecap Dislocation

Kneecap dislocation occurs when the triangle-shaped bone covering the knee (patella) moves or slides out of place. The problem usually occurs toward the outside of the leg.

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

The iliotibial band (ITB) is a tendon that runs along the outside of your leg. It connects from the top of your pelvic bone to just below your knee. A tendon is thick elastic tissue that connects muscle to bone. Iliotibial band syndrome occurs when the ITB becomes swollen and irritated from rubbing against the bone on the outside of your hip or knee.

Hamstring Strain

A strain is when a muscle becomes overstretched and tears. This painful injury is also called a "pulled muscle." If you have strained your hamstring, you have pulled one or more of the muscles on the back of your upper leg (thigh). There are 3 levels of hamstring strains: Grade 1 -- mild muscle strain or pull Grade 2 -- partial muscle tear Grade 3 -- complete muscle tear

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Injury

The PCL is one of several ligaments that keep your knee stable. The PCL helps keep your leg bones in place and allows your knee to move back and forth. It is the strongest ligament in the knee. PCL tears often occur as a result of a severe knee injury. A PCL injury occurs when the ligament is stretched or torn. A partial PCL tear occurs when only part of the ligament is torn. A complete PCL tear occurs when the entire ligament is torn into two pieces.  

Partial Knee Replacement

A partial knee replacement is surgery to replace only one part of a damaged knee. It can replace either the inside (medial) part, the outside (lateral) part, or the kneecap part of the knee. Partial knee replacement surgery removes damaged tissue and bone in the knee joint. It is done when arthritis is present in only part of the knee. The areas are replaced with a man-made implant, called a prosthetic. The rest of your knee is preserved. Partial knee replacements are most often done with smaller incisions, so there is less recovery time.

ACL Reconstruction

ACL reconstruction is surgery to reconstruct the ligament in the center of your knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) connects your shin bone (tibia) to your thigh bone (femur). A tear of this ligament can cause your knee to give way during physical activity.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the ligament in the center of the knee that connects your shin bone (tibia) to your thigh bone (femur). It prevents the shin bone from sliding out in front of the thigh bone

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

An anterior cruciate ligament injury is the over-stretching or tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. A tear may be partial or complete. The knee joint is located where the end of the thigh bone (femur) meets the top of the shin bone (tibia). Four main ligaments connect these two bones: Medial collateral ligament (MCL) runs along the inside of the knee. It prevents the knee from bending in Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) runs along the outside of the knee. It prevents the knee from bending out Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. It prevents the shin bone from sliding out in front of the thigh bone Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) works with the ACL. It prevents the shin bone from sliding backwards under the femur Women are more likely to have an ACL tear than men.

Meniscus

The meniscus is a c-shaped piece of cartilage in your knee joint. You have two in each knee. The meniscus forms a tough but flexible cushion between the bones in your knee to protect the joint. The meniscus: Acts like a shock-absorber Helps distribute the weight to the cartilage Helps to stabilize your knee joint Can tear and limit your ability to flex and extend your knee