Hip

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

The iliotibial band (ITB) is a tendon that runs along the outside of your leg. It connects from the top of your pelvic bone to just below your knee. A tendon is thick elastic tissue that connects muscle to bone. Iliotibial band syndrome occurs when the ITB becomes swollen and irritated from rubbing against the bone on the outside of your hip or knee.

Hip Fracture

Hip fractures occur as a result of major or minor trauma. In elderly patients with bones weakened by osteoporosis, relatively little trauma, even walking, may result in a hip fracture.

Trochanteric Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, bone, and joints. Bursitis is the swelling and irritation of a bursa. The bursa that covers the outside of your hip is called the greater trochanter bursa. Trochanteric bursitis occurs when the bursa in your hip becomes swollen and irritated. This is a common cause of hip pain.

Perthes Disease

Perthes Disease, also known as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, occurs when the ball of the thigh bone in the hip does not get enough blood, causing the bone to die.

Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH)

The hip is a ball and socket joint. The ball is called the femoral head. It forms the top part of the thigh bone (femur). The socket (acetabulum) forms in the pelvic bone. In some newborns, the socket is too shallow and the ball (thigh bone) may slip out of the socket, either part of the way or completely. One or both hips may be involved.

Arthroscopy

A surgical technique that involves making a small incision in the skin over the joint. A small lighted tube (arthroscope) with a camera is inserted through this incision.

Joint Replacement Surgery

Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. Replacing a joint can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.

Hip Replacement Surgery

Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. The goals of hip replacement surgery are to: Relieve pain Help the hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements

Growth Plate Injuries

Growth plates are areas of growing tissues that cause the long bones in children and teens to grow. Injuries to the growth plate happen when a break or fracture develops near or at the end of a long bone. The growth plate is the weakest part of the growing skeleton. Growth plate injuries usually happen at the: Bones of the legs. Wrist. Ankle. Foot. Hip bone. When you finish growing, the growth plate closes and are replaced by solid bone. Growth plate injuries happen to children and teens. This injury happens twice as often in boys as in girls.

Bursitis

People get bursitis by overusing a joint. It can also be caused by an injury. It usually occurs at the knee or elbow. Kneeling or leaning your elbows on a hard surface for a long time can make bursitis start. Doing the same kinds of movements every day or putting stress on joints increases your risk. Symptoms of bursitis include pain and swelling. Your doctor will diagnose bursitis with a physical exam and tests such as x-rays and MRIs. He or she may also take fluid from the swollen area to be sure the problem isn't an infection. Treatment of bursitis includes rest, pain medicines, or ice. If there is no improvement, your doctor may inject a drug into the area around the swollen bursa. If the joint still does not improve after 6 to 12 months, you may need surgery to repair damage and relieve pressure on the bursa.