Foot & Ankle

Claw Foot

Claw foot is a deformity of the foot. The toe joint nearest the ankle is bent upward and the other toe joints are bent downward. The toe looks like a claw.

Ankle Fracture

An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ankle bones. These fractures may: Be partial (the bone is only partially cracked, not all the way through) Be complete (the bone is broken through and is in 2 parts) Occur on one or both sides of the ankle

Blount Disease

Blount disease is a growth disorder of the shin bone (tibia) in which the lower leg turns inward, making it look like a bowleg.

Tenosynovitis

Tenosynovitis is inflammation of the lining of the sheath that surrounds a tendon (the cord that joins muscle to bone).

Arthroscopy

A surgical technique that involves making a small incision in the skin over the joint. A small lighted tube (arthroscope) with a camera is inserted through this incision.

Joint Replacement Surgery

Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. Replacing a joint can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.

Growth Plate Injuries

Growth plates are areas of growing tissues that cause the long bones in children and teens to grow. Injuries to the growth plate happen when a break or fracture develops near or at the end of a long bone. The growth plate is the weakest part of the growing skeleton. Growth plate injuries usually happen at the: Bones of the legs. Wrist. Ankle. Foot. Hip bone. When you finish growing, the growth plate closes and are replaced by solid bone. Growth plate injuries happen to children and teens. This injury happens twice as often in boys as in girls.

Tendinitis

Tendons are flexible bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones. They help your muscles move your bones. Tendinitis is the severe swelling of a tendon. Tendinitis usually happens after repeated injury to an area such as the wrist or ankle. It causes pain and soreness around a joint. Some common forms of tendinitis are named after the sports that increase their risk. They include tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, pitcher's shoulder, swimmer's shoulder, and jumper's knee. Doctors diagnose tendinitis with your medical history, a physical exam, and imaging tests. The first step in treatment is to reduce pain and swelling. Rest, wrapping or elevating the affected area, and medicines can help. Ice is helpful for recent, severe injuries. Other treatments include ultrasound, physical therapy, steroid injections, and surgery.

Wrist Injuries and Disorders

Your wrist is made up of eight small bones known as carpals. They support a tube that runs through your wrist. That tube, called the carpal tunnel, has tendons and a nerve inside. It is covered by a ligament, which holds it in place. Wrist pain is common. Repetitive motion can damage your wrist. Everyday activities like typing, racquet sports or sewing can cause pain, or even carpal tunnel syndrome. Wrist pain with bruising and swelling can be a sign of injury. The signs of a possible fracture include misshapen joints and inability to move your wrist. Some wrist fractures are a result of osteoporosis. Other common causes of pain are Sprains and strains Tendinitis Arthritis Gout and pseudogout

Walking Problems

We walk thousands of steps each day. We walk to do our daily activities, get around, and exercise. Having a problem with walking can make daily life more difficult. The pattern of how you walk is called your gait. A variety of problems can cause an abnormal gait and lead to problems with walking. These include: Injuries, diseases, or abnormal development of the muscles or bones of your legs or feet Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.