Bariatrics

Laparoscopic Gastric Band

Laparoscopic gastric banding is surgery to help with weight loss. The surgeon places a band around the upper part of your stomach to create a small pouch to hold food. The band limits the amount of food you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band to make food pass more slowly or quickly through your stomach. Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are severely obese and have not been able to lose weight through diet and exercise. Laparoscopic gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must diet and exercise after this surgery. If you do not, you may have complications or poor weight loss. People who have this surgery should be mentally stable and not be dependent on alcohol or illegal drugs. Doctors often use the following body mass index (BMI) measures to identify patients who may be most likely to benefit from weight-loss surgery. A normal BMI is between 18.5 and 25. This procedure may be recommended for you if you have A (BMI) of 40 or more. This usually means that men are 100 pounds overweight and women are 80 pounds over their ideal weight. A BMI of 35 or more and a serious medical condition that might improve with weight loss. Some of these conditions are sleep apnea, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Laparoscopy

Laparoscopic surgery uses a viewing tool called a laparoscope.  While the patient is deep asleep and pain-free under general anesthesia, the doctor makes a half-inch surgical cut in the skin below the belly button. Carbon dioxide gas is pumped into the abdomen to help the doctor see the organs more easily. The laparoscope, an instrument that looks like a small telescope with a light and a video camera, is inserted so the doctor can view the area. Other instruments may be inserted through other small cuts in the lower abdomen. While watching a video monitor, the doctor is able to: Get tissue samples (biopsy) Look for the cause of any symptoms Remove scar tissue or other abnormal tissue, such as from endometriosis Repair or remove part or all of the ovaries or uterine tubes Repair or remove parts of the uterus Do other surgical procedures (such as appendectomy, removing lymph nodes) After the laparoscopy, the carbon dioxide gas is released, and the cuts are closed. .  

Incision

An incision is a cut through the skin made during surgery. It's also called a "surgical wound." Some incisions are small. Others are very long. The size of an incisions depend on the kind of surgery you had. Closing a surgical wound can help your wound heal faster. To close your incision, your doctor used one of the following: Stitches (sutures) Clips Staples Skin glue Proper wound care can help prevent infection and reduce scarring as your surgical wound heals.  

Hemoglobin Test

Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. The hemoglobin test is a commonly ordered blood test and is almost always done as part of a complete blood count (CBC). Common reasons or conditions for ordering the hemoglobin test include: Symptoms such as fatigue, feelings of poor health, or unexplained weight loss Signs of bleeding are present Before and after major surgery During pregnancy Presence of chronic kidney disease or many other chronic medical problems Monitoring of anemia and its cause Monitoring during treatment for cancer Monitoring medicines that may cause anemia or low blood counts  

Vertical Banded Gastroplasty

In this procedure the upper stomach near the esophagus is stapled vertically to create a small pouch along the inner curve of the stomach. The outlet from the pouch to the rest of the stomach is restricted by a band made of special material. The band delays the emptying of food from the pouch, causing a feeling of fullness.  

Gastric Bypass

After the surgery, your stomach will be smaller. You will feel full with less food. The food you eat will no longer go into some parts of your stomach and small intestine that absorb food. Because of this, your body will not get all of the calories from the food you eat. Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are very obese and have not been able to lose weight through diet and exercise. Doctors often use the body mass index (BMI) and health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from weight-loss surgery. Gastric bypass surgery is not a quick fix for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. After this surgery, you must eat healthy foods, control portion sizes of what you eat, and exercise. If you do not follow these measures, you may have complications from the surgery and poor weight loss. This procedure may be recommended if you have A BMI of 40 or more. Someone with a BMI of 40 or more is at least 100 pounds over their recommended weight. A normal BMI is between 18.5 to 25. A BMI of 35 or more and a serious medical condition that might improve with weight loss. Some of these conditions are obstructive sleep apnea, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Dumping Syndrome

The partially digested food draws excess fluid into the small intestine causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much simple or refined sugar in people who have had surgery to modify or remove all or part of the stomach.