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Be Your Authentic Self: Celebrating Diversity Series

Harbin Clinic is proud to continue its series celebrating its rich diversity of experience, entitled “Be Your Authentic Self: Celebrating Diversity”. As a part of our workplace culture, we believe that when we bring our authentic selves to work, we connect with others in a genuine way that boosts engagement and productivity.

When this takes place, it enhances our ability to not only care completely for one another but most importantly, our patients and the communities we serve. To launch this year’s series, we celebrate Black History Month with some of our employees. We asked them to share an inspirational Black historical figure who inspires them and why.

Robin Bohanon, Front Office Trainer

Robin Bohanon, Front Office Trainer

Celebrating Black History Month, I reflect on prominent African American figures like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and Malcolm X. Current historical African American figures such as Kamala Harris, Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and Tyler Perry have also impacted history and my life.

Of all the inspirational black historical figures, Sojourner Truth, born Isabella Baumfree, has inspired me the most. I admire her because she dedicated her life to encouraging black people to preserve and attain their equality. Being an activist and reformer, in 1850, Sojourner Truth spoke at the first National Women’s Rights Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts. After this life-changing event, she began touring regularly with abolitionist George Thompson, speaking to large crowds about slavery and human rights. As her reputation grew, so did the movement for change and equal rights. To this day, her life and purpose have motivated me and have positively impacted my life as a professional African American woman.

Shelia Janice, Clinical Applications Analyst

Shelia Janice, Clinical Applications Analyst

I continue to be inspired by Mary McLeod Bethune. Although this inspirational black historical figure was born during a time (1875-1955) when slavery was prevalent, being one of 17 children, she worked tirelessly in the cotton fields with her family. Amid obstacles, she did not allow her environment to keep her from achieving her goals and dreams. Staying true to herself, she did not allow her past to define her future. To add, she used the negativity she encountered to educate others. No matter what she faced, she devoted her life to improving the lives of African Americans through education and equality. It is my greatest hope that I honor her contributions to the African American Society by standing tall in her vision that “Nothing is impossible!”

Dr. Lucie Mitchell, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Dr. Lucie Mitchell, Spine & Pain Management

Throughout his impressive career, Chadwick Boseman was someone who inspired me. In his stillness, he rode the tides and shook the world. Even in death, his legacy has a strong impact on many. As I reflect, my children and I had the opportunity to see a superhero who looked like them and saw the human behind the mask. Through witnessing and watching him, they learned to dream big and know that life offers unlimited possibilities. Of his many accomplishments, Boseman was an outlier, per Malcolm Gladewell, who took a deep dive into his story. In his words, we see the making of the Black Panther in real-time. To date, one of my favorite speeches he gave was at Howard University’s 150th commencement ceremony. During the speech, he said, “I don’t know what your future is, but if you’re willing to take the harder way, the more complicated one, the one with more failures at first than successes . . . then you will not regret it.” Through this thought, Boseman emphasized that our legacy should not be wrapped up in the amount of money one has but in the daily challenges they choose to confront and put God first. In summation, I aspire to honor our past and press on with a purpose to inspire others about our legacy.

Keisha Law, Office Coordinator with General Surgery Cartersville

Keisha Law, Office Coordinator

As I think about Black Historical figures that inspire me, several come to mind. To name a few, Harriet Tubman, Maya Angelou, Madam C.J. Walker, Martin Luther King Jr., and Michelle Obama resonate with me. I admire and love how brave they are and how they rose above adversity. Celebrating Black History is very important because it demonstrates how far our nation has come. While there are still opportunities to evolve, this month highlights and brings awareness to the contributions of so many.

Joshua McClure, Corporate Communications & Patient Experience Manager

Joshua McClure, Corporate Communications & Patient Experience Manager

Langston Hughes | Poet | 1902-1967

Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist. Born in Missouri, he moved to New York at an early age, becoming one of the earliest innovators of a new art form, jazz poetry. Having an ear for music and sound, I am inspired by his innate ability to connect poetry and jazz. While there may be things that separate people, music is something that unites us. Regardless of age, background, or race, music’s melodic sounds and storytelling resonate with everyone.

Published February 3, 2022

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