Anti-Cancer Nutrition

Eating a plant-based, well-balanced diet can greatly reduce your risk of cancer. In addition, plant foods can help you maintain a healthy weight because they are low in calories and high in fiber, which helps with satiating hunger. Here a few guidelines to healthy, anti-cancer eating:

  • Keep lean red meats to less than one time per week. Choose chicken or cold water fish, such as salmon, instead. Do not eat food grilled at high temperatures. Cook low and slow.
  • Eat half a plateful of vegetables at least two times per day, and remember to eat your beans.
  • Try to choose many colors of vegetables every day, as different colored foods have different nutrients.
  • Eat fruit with each meal instead of a sugary dessert.  
  • For an easy way to get in servings of vegetables and fruit, as well as a clean protein source, try one of our Healthy smoothie recipes once a day.
  • Avoid dairy milk, though yogurt and occasional cheese are okay. Use almond or rice milk instead of dairy. 
  • Choose whole grains (look for the word “whole” as the first word in the ingredients label on bread, pasta, cereal, and crackers)
  • Limit processed foods. Processed foods are anything you cannot buy in the form you are going to eat. If it has a food label, it is a processed food.
  • Avoid Trans fats, as they have a  detrimental effect on health.
  • Avoid sugary drinks.
  • Eliminate beverages like soda, juice, and tea and coffee drinks with added sugar.
  • Limit baked goods, candy, and sugary foods. Avoid added sugar.
  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Drink ½ ounce of clean water per pound of body weight daily.
  • Enjoy green tea, which is cancer preventive. One tea bag can be re-used all day long. If you are caffeine sensitive, throw away the first cup which contains 99% of the caffeine.  
  • Eat fruit with each meal.
  • Choose whole grains (look for the word “whole” as the first word in the ingredients label on bread, pasta, cereal, and crackers)
  • Limit processed foods. Processed foods are anything you cannot buy in the form you are going to eat. If it has a food label it is a processed food.
  • Limit fats. All fat is high in calories. Avoid saturated and trans fats, as they have the most detrimental effect on health.
  • Limit sugars. Pay attention to beverages like soda, juice, and tea and coffee drinks with added sugar. Limit baked goods, candy, and sugary foods. Avoid added sugar.
  • Avoid alcohol.

Foster an environment of healthy eating in your home.

Stock your pantry with beans, brown rice, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, canned and fresh tomatoes, canned tuna, salmon and chicken, plant oils (olive, canola, peanut) and non-fat cooking spray.

Stock your refrigerator with fresh meats (chicken, turkey, and fish), flaxseed, onions, garlic, shallots, dark green vegetables (kale, broccoli, and collards), and a variety of fruits including citrus.

Should I buy organic?

It's a common question asked - is buying organic worth the expense? The answer is yes for some things (the dirty dozen), and not really for others (the clean fifteen). Organic eggs, milk and chicken can be considered as they will not have pesticide residue that could be hormonally active (especially important in breast, ovarian, endometrial and prostate cancers). 

Dirty Dozen (buy these organic)

Peach, apple, bell pepper, celery, nectarine, strawberries, cherries, kale, lettuce, imported grapes, carrot, pear

Clean Fifteen (these are the lowest in pesticides)

Onion, avocado, sweet corn, pineapple, mango, asparagus, sweet peas, sweet potato, kiwi, cabbage, eggplant, papaya, watermelon, broccoli, tomato